A Complex Geography: the Terrain of Transference and Countertransference in Couple Therapy
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£25.00
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A Complex Geography: the Terrain of Transference and Countertransference in Couple Therapy

A Complex Geography: the Terrain of Transference and Countertransference in Couple Therapy

Lectures from the Tavistock Model

With Krisztina Glausius

Since 1948 Tavistock Relationships has been instrumental in building a rich and effective therapeutic model to support couple relationships. The model is based on the principles of psychoanalytic psychotherapy, and grounded in decades of research, offering a depth approach to working with the couple relationships.

This series of lectures provides a comprehensive exploration of psychoanalytic perspectives on couple relationships as well as an understanding of how to work therapeutically with couples and is suitable for anyone working with couples, interested to start working with couples or simply interested in the complexities inherent in being in a relationship.

The talks include the importance of the interplay of past influences, present dynamics, as well as the future potential in couple relationships, framing the couple as vehicle for creative development throughout the life cycle.

Clinical issues with couples work such as the complex terrain of transference and countertransference and a different way of working considering there are three in the room are discussed.

These lectures collectively offer insights which will enrich your understanding of psychoanalytic approaches to the complexity of couple relationships.

Programme

Krisztina Glausius
A Complex Geography: the Terrain of Transference and Countertransference in Couple Therapy

Much analytic work with individual patients takes place on the intricately layered terrain made up of our patients’ complex and shifting transference to their therapist and our own interpretations informed by the corresponding countertransference. Speaking to patients about our understanding of what is alive in the two-some of the analytic couple at any given moment is fundamental and lends each treatment its unique and particular atmosphere. This constantly changing transferential web holds within itself a multitude of repetitions and enactments waiting for interpretation. Krisztina Glausius in her lecture will consider the opportunities brought about by the introduction of the couple and their relationship into this already complex matrix. The extra dimension of ‘the third’ can both muddy the waters and clear up previously murky aspects of both the couple’s relationship and the internal world of each partner.