six by three grid of pioneering psychoanalysts pictured in a painted style
CPD Credits
1
Event Type
Live Online Event
Location
Zoom & Recording for 365 days
Time
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Standard
£30.00
Trainee/NHS
£25.50
Book Tickets
six by three grid of pioneering psychoanalysts pictured in a painted style
Monday, March 4, 2024

The Analyst’s Torment: Unbearable Mental States in Countertransference

Karnac Author Series

With Dhwani Shah & Letticia Banton (Chair)

In contrast to exploring the patient's mind from a safe distance, this conference will focus on the clinician’s feelings, subjective experiences, and histories, and their impact on the intersubjective space of the therapeutic encounter. Understanding our own motivations and difficulties with painful mental states generated in therapy is at the heart of an ethical clinical practice. This authentic self-exploration is vital for every unique encounter within the shared space of both the analyst and patient.

In this program, Dhwani Shah will explore how the analyst’s uncomfortable and disowned emotional states of mind are inevitably entangled with the therapeutic process and have the potential to derail or facilitate therapeutic work. Specific emotional and mental states will be explored in detail, including dread, arrogance, dissociation, and shame. These experiences illustrate common ways in which therapists stop listening and struggle in the face of uncertainty and intensity.

Through theoretical and clinical material, Dhwani will attempt to demonstrate how the analyst’s capacity to experience and work with these states is vital to understanding and metabolizing patients' emotional experiences and maintaining an ethical and therapeutic stance. Please join us for a talk followed by a discussion.

Programme

13.00 (UK) Introductions and Zoom Housekeeping
13.05 Dhwani Shah
The Analyst’s Torment: Unbearable Mental States in Countertransference

Dhwani Shah moves the focus from using psychoanalytic theory and technique to explore the patient’s mind from a safe distance. Instead, he concentrates on the analyst’s feelings, subjective experiences, and histories, and how these impact on the intersubjective space between analyst and patient. This is vital for every unique encounter within the shared space of both the analyst and patient. The analyst must strive to be responsive, yet disciplined, and this requires the work of mentalization. The analyst’s uncomfortable and disowned emotional states of mind are inevitably entangled with the therapeutic process, and this has the potential to derail or facilitate progress.

13.40 Question and Answers with Participants

An opportunity to ask Dhwani Shah questions relating to the presentation and how you might integrate his thinking into your clinical practice.

14.00 End